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Project update, small changes for Tosbo

Before tearing the car completely apart sometime next year, I’m trying to repair, retrofit, modify, optimize a few things.

As the car wasn’t that nice to drive, so first thing was to remove the cut springs and replace them by some new ones of the same brand. Of course it now looks to high, imho, but it drives way better. Cut springs had no preload at all, and no real travel, as the slightest compression would let it sit on it’s bumpstopts.

I also removed the slightly worn steering wheel and fitted my Nardi ‘deep’ wich I had laying around. I’m not sure what steering wheel I’ll mount after the resto.

Ordered and mounted some Ramair filters for the DCOEs and repaired the water temp.

I sourced a non series 1 driveshaft, moustache bar and rear transverse link. This is all thats needed to change the rear drivetrain to the later geometry. While at it I also changed the diff support for a hangingt RT diffmount. No more straps or rubber bumbers for Tosbo.

In my quest to optimize the driving sensation a bit more, the car needed a rear swaybar. As it hadn’t any at all. I ordered a complete ST suspensions swaybar set from the US.

And I played with wheels, a lot 😉 Work, Rotas, Konig and JBW

Removed the bumperettes.

Oh, and I enjoyed it a lot.

Now I’m waiting for some camber tops for the front axle and the car definately needs an upgrade in the seat department!

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BIG UPDATE: New Datsun 240Z New Project, the dream-datsun

Big news, I acquired a second Datsun 240Z. At the end I couldn’t resist any longer and had to buy this yellow beauty from my best mate!
So a few months ago my mate Yves decided to sell it, what a bad decision 😉 I hesitated to long, and it was pretty much sold, but I’ve been given a second chance and now it’s mine. Couldn’t be any happier.
1970 series 1 240Z, originally in universal blue, but refinished 30+ years ago in yellow.

Cool story bro: Back in 2004 (or was it 2005) this particular car was my first real encounter with a 240Z. I knew since circa 2003 that I would love to own one, but as they aren’t really common here in Europe this yellow and a purple one which was parked just next to it where the first S30 I really laid my eyes on. Even took 3 picture of it back then, so here is one of them.
And yes it’s 100% the same car my best buddy bought about 13-14 years later.

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I’ll drive it ‘as is’ for at least this summer, which gives me time to establish a plan for it’s ‘nut&bolt’ resto.
As my blue 240Z now has Work Equip wheels I instantly mounted my 14″ wheels:

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Project Datto: postponed some mods

Out of consideration for my other project cars (E36&Fiat 128) I had to postpone the completion of the cruise control and the installation of the rear disc brakes on my 240Z.
But as these mods aren’t vital or huge tasks, they can easily be done in 1 day during the season. So they’ll have to wait.
So the Datsun is now together and waiting for the season to begin.

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Over the winter I managed to change the hatch seals, the hatch hinges, started some cruise control stuff, rebuilt my 5-speed gearbox, renewed the drivers seat chassis section, replaced the drivers door seal, got the new WORK wheels, changed the speedo’s fascia to km/h, relocated the choke lever mount, fabricated some new “padded” vinyl covers for the tunnel, sills and the vertical portion of the parcel shelve behind the seats, fitted new kick panels and some other minor stuff

Now let’s hope for some good weather soon

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Project Datto: new shoes (almost)

Whoop whoop, just got contacted to inform me that my new wheels for the Datto have been finished assembling at WORK wheels in Japan. Now I’ll patiently wait for them to be delivered.

Yepp, I finally decided to spend some bucks and buy the dream wheels for my dream car.

WORK Equip40 in 15×8. Gold centers with polished lips. 2 things I already know by now:

  • I will love how they look
  • I will hate to clean them (the actual gunmetal wheels are so easy to clean

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by monkeymagic

Alps part 2

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So here is a list of our route:

Stage 0+1 Luxembourg-Grimselpasshöhe  460km + 160km

As some of us (2x240Z and the BMW 1600-2) didn’t like to start early on a Wednesday morning, we decided to drive down to Switzerland a day early and spent the evening/night near Luzern. So we took a leisurely cruise to Switzerland without slowing down the others on the highway.

Luxembourg – Luzern – Brünigpass – Sustenpass – San Gottardo – Nufenenpass – Grimselpasshöhe

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Stage 2 Grimselpasshöhe – Livigno  350km

Grimselpasshöhe – Furkapass – Lukmanierpass – San Bernardino Pass – Splügenpass – Malojapass – Berninapass – Via Forcola – Livigno

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Stage 3 Livigno – Livigno  219km

Livigno – Ofenpass – Umbrailpass – Passo Stelvio – Gaviapass – Mortirolopass – Passo di Foscagno – Livigno

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Stage 4 Livigno – Arosa 241km

Livigno – Flüelapass – Albulapass – Julierpass – Lenzerheidepass – Arosa
Where the Arosa classic hillrace was held on that day

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Stage 5 Arosa – Luxembourg 581km

Mostly boring highways and such. Easy drive back home

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Alps 2019

About 6 weeks ago I returned from this years trip to the swiss and italian alps.

Due to lack of time and laziness, I didn’t had the opportunity to share the pics of this trip with you guys.

I won’t write a huge post about it. Just the most necessary: 5 days, 2500km, 25 alp passes, 12 buddies, another lifetime experience. My Datsun 240Z did great! All in all we were a group of 9 cars with 5 classics:

2x Datsun 240Z

2x Triumph GT6

1x BMW 1600-2

and a Z4M, an BMW M3, a Camaro, a Mustang.

I will add the complete route later. The Daily stages were:

Luxembourg-Grimselpasshöhe

Grimselpasshöhe-Livigno

Livigno-Livigno

Livigno-Arosa

Arosa-Luxembourg

Our group:

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So here is a gallery from DAY 1, more will follow:

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Project Datto update

So yesterday I took the car out for a spin, so winter is officially over for the Datto.

But first things first, Here are 2 more modifications I did these last few weeks. I fitted new 3-point inertia safety belts (more on this later). And I fitted the 123 ignition distributor.


Yes, it’s a complete distributor, advance can be programmed via Bluetooth and the 123 app on your phone. Installation was straight forward, just go by the manual, easy peasy. Mount everything up
connect 2 wires
set the dizzy according to the 123 manual
hook up the 3rd wire
Put a cap on the dizzy and wire your spark wires according to the firing order and relative to the position of the dizzy finger after the installation.

So here are a few questions I had prior the installation and which I now can answer myself.
Will the tach still work?    Yes
Keep or ditch the coil ballast?      I used a new Bosch Red coil which has a primary resistance of 1.6 Ohm, so I kept the ballast. Works fine. If you are using a 3 Ohm coil, you might be able to ditch the ballast.
These are the advance curves I’m running from start, they might change slightly once I got more time to play with them.

 

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Project Datto: Winter Update

So as the winter period is the time of the year to do some resto work and updates, here is a little update. This winter it’s mostly around the rear of the car. So I removed the fuel tank, inspected the inside and decided an outside resto is all it needed. I mechanically stripped it, put it in rust converter (KSD Kovermi) and brush painted it in Brantho Corrux 3-1, which is a primer, rust protector and paint. All in one.

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I also decided to clean that mess of vent hoses which can be found on these later and US cars. I pretty much converted it to early EU/Japan layout. Put on all new hoses, restored the tank fixing straps (Stripped, rust converter, paint), new vents.
Here is a graph of my new vent line layout:

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While the tank was out I also cleaned the underside. How could you not. So same process as always: stripping old under seal and paint, rust converter, 3in1 paint.

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As I also had ordered new U-joints, boots,… quite a while ago I restored the rear axles to. Removed the axles, disassembled and cleaned, stripped the paint, repainted, greased everything up. Removed the U-joints, fitted new U-joints with the shop press, fitted new boots.

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And I prepared everything for a rear wing install. No, not necessarily for the looks only, but to test and try to get rid of the exhaust fumes in the car. It’s worth a try!
But more on this later.