Alps part 2

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So here is a list of our route:

Stage 0+1 Luxembourg-Grimselpasshöhe  460km + 160km

As some of us (2x240Z and the BMW 1600-2) didn’t like to start early on a Wednesday morning, we decided to drive down to Switzerland a day early and spent the evening/night near Luzern. So we took a leisurely cruise to Switzerland without slowing down the others on the highway.

Luxembourg – Luzern – Brünigpass – Sustenpass – San Gottardo – Nufenenpass – Grimselpasshöhe

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Stage 2 Grimselpasshöhe – Livigno  350km

Grimselpasshöhe – Furkapass – Lukmanierpass – San Bernardino Pass – Splügenpass – Malojapass – Berninapass – Via Forcola – Livigno

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Stage 3 Livigno – Livigno  219km

Livigno – Ofenpass – Umbrailpass – Passo Stelvio – Gaviapass – Mortirolopass – Passo di Foscagno – Livigno

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Stage 4 Livigno – Arosa 241km

Livigno – Flüelapass – Albulapass – Julierpass – Lenzerheidepass – Arosa
Where the Arosa classic hillrace was held on that day

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Stage 5 Arosa – Luxembourg 581km

Mostly boring highways and such. Easy drive back home

Alps 2019

About 6 weeks ago I returned from this years trip to the swiss and italian alps.

Due to lack of time and laziness, I didn’t had the opportunity to share the pics of this trip with you guys.

I won’t write a huge post about it. Just the most necessary: 5 days, 2500km, 25 alp passes, 12 buddies, another lifetime experience. My Datsun 240Z did great! All in all we were a group of 9 cars with 5 classics:

2x Datsun 240Z

2x Triumph GT6

1x BMW 1600-2

and a Z4M, an BMW M3, a Camaro, a Mustang.

I will add the complete route later. The Daily stages were:

Luxembourg-Grimselpasshöhe

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Livigno-Livigno

Livigno-Arosa

Arosa-Luxembourg

Our group:

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So here is a gallery from DAY 1, more will follow:

Project Datto update

So yesterday I took the car out for a spin, so winter is officially over for the Datto.

But first things first, Here are 2 more modifications I did these last few weeks. I fitted new 3-point inertia safety belts (more on this later). And I fitted the 123 ignition distributor.


Yes, it’s a complete distributor, advance can be programmed via Bluetooth and the 123 app on your phone. Installation was straight forward, just go by the manual, easy peasy. Mount everything up
connect 2 wires
set the dizzy according to the 123 manual
hook up the 3rd wire
Put a cap on the dizzy and wire your spark wires according to the firing order and relative to the position of the dizzy finger after the installation.

So here are a few questions I had prior the installation and which I now can answer myself.
Will the tach still work?    Yes
Keep or ditch the coil ballast?      I used a new Bosch Red coil which has a primary resistance of 1.6 Ohm, so I kept the ballast. Works fine. If you are using a 3 Ohm coil, you might be able to ditch the ballast.
These are the advance curves I’m running from start, they might change slightly once I got more time to play with them.

 

Project Datto: Winter Update

So as the winter period is the time of the year to do some resto work and updates, here is a little update. This winter it’s mostly around the rear of the car. So I removed the fuel tank, inspected the inside and decided an outside resto is all it needed. I mechanically stripped it, put it in rust converter (KSD Kovermi) and brush painted it in Brantho Corrux 3-1, which is a primer, rust protector and paint. All in one.

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I also decided to clean that mess of vent hoses which can be found on these later and US cars. I pretty much converted it to early EU/Japan layout. Put on all new hoses, restored the tank fixing straps (Stripped, rust converter, paint), new vents.
Here is a graph of my new vent line layout:

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While the tank was out I also cleaned the underside. How could you not. So same process as always: stripping old under seal and paint, rust converter, 3in1 paint.

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As I also had ordered new U-joints, boots,… quite a while ago I restored the rear axles to. Removed the axles, disassembled and cleaned, stripped the paint, repainted, greased everything up. Removed the U-joints, fitted new U-joints with the shop press, fitted new boots.

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And I prepared everything for a rear wing install. No, not necessarily for the looks only, but to test and try to get rid of the exhaust fumes in the car. It’s worth a try!
But more on this later.

My roadtrip to the french alps

So, I’m Back from France, and how could I start posting about this? So here comes my conclusion first: “This might be the best automobile experience in 22 years of motoring”. And this is due to the car I did it in, my Datsun 240Z. Period.

Definitely a bucket list item that should be on every petrol heads list:

  • # Roadtrip through the alps in you classic car. (with a bunch of mates)

All in all I completed 2434km (about 1525miles) in 5 days/4nights. 23 passroads, the “route Napoléon”, some canyons, and had the best views.
I tried to be prepared the best I could, and had quite some tools an spares with me. All that was needed was 0.6l of oil to top up and a 22mm wrench. It really was a trouble-free trip for the Datsun. Every day after arriving at the hotel I did some 30mins of general checks. All I found was a loose nut on the tie rod end. That’s why the 22mm was needed once 😉

When we left Luxembourg we had the following cars in our group of mates:
2x Datsun 240Z (1 yellow 1970, 1 blue 1973)
2x Triumph GT6 (1 yellow, 1 blue)
1x Porsche 911 964
1x Golf II GTI
1x Chevrolet Camaro 2016

But bad luck stroke fast. Even before crossing the french border the blue Triumph GT6 had a seized caliper and they went back home and changed it for the Triumph’s passenger ’85 Porsche 911 3.2.
The yellow 240Z had completely blown it’s brake booster, unfortunately my spare 73 booster didn’t fit. So they changed the 240Z for a Toyota GT86 to continue the trip.
I would have loved to have 2 Datsuns on this trip, but maybe next year Yves + Tom will have more luck, so that the yellow and blue 240Z can conquer the alps together

The map shows you the interesting bit of our roadtrip, with the daily stages. Nobody cares about the highway from Luxembourg to the alps, right?
As we where off holiday season, the passroads where actually quite empty. Not many bicycles, almost no caravans, a real pleasure!

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Unfortunately 2 cars broke down during our 4 days in the alps. The yellow GT6 had problems with the mechanical injection of its PI engine. And these things aren’t really user serviceable on the side of the road. The red 911 completely lost 2nd gear while downshifting to pass a tractor. And doing alproads and hairpin bends without 2nd gear is no fun. So the GT6 was sent back home on a tow truck, and the 911 limped itself home in 5th gear on the highway. The GT86 had some minor brake problems, but some tinkering got the car through the trip.

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One day I will report some more about the driving, the alps, the vues,… but for now I’ll just let you admire some pictures I took. And I’ll start with 2 of my favorites.

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